Christmas 2019

When I was growing up and we would get together with family, one of the things we would do is open up picture albums and tell family stories. Things like, “This was the ship your grandfather’s family sailed on in order to came to America from Prussia.” “This was your father right after he got out of Boot Camp.” “This is your mom and dad on his graduation from Supply School in Athens, Georgia.”  

I hope that I am wrong but I fear that we are losing our family stories. We have gone from sharing our common history to being lost in our individual worlds. “This is what I had for breakfast.” “This is a selfie of me on vacation.” “Here’s a picture of my latest tattoo.” 

Please don’t think that I have become my father’s generation, speaking against those long hair boys from England called the Beatles who will never amount to anything. I am not advocating that we abandon technology and return to picture albums. Rather I am pleading that we not lose our family stories because those stories are so very important. They define who we are; they give us our personal awareness. They tell us where we fit in this world. They even help us to find direction for our lives. I was talking with a woman one time and she said to me, “There are three things that you need to understand about me. I am a woman, I am Irish and I am Roman Catholic and none of those three things will ever change.” I respected that answer and I respected the clarity of her life. So in this Christmas season, if you are blessed enough to be around family, talk with them and learn your family story. 

But let me quickly add that as important as it is for you to know your family story, I believe that it is vastly more important to know your family story in the context of the story that we hear tonight, the greatest story ever told. And if you think that those two stories are unrelated may I suggest that you could not be more wrong. The Creator of the Universe became flesh precisely so that He could become a part of our story, a part of your story. As we heard from St. Paul, Christ Jesus “gave himself for us to redeem us…and to purify for himself a people for his own possession….”  He comes to know your temptations, to share in your sufferings, to give you new life, to provide a way to become all that you were created to be. Eugene Peterson wrote. “God shapes us for his eternal purposes and he begins right here. The dust out of which we are made and the image of God into which we are made are one and the same.” 

God does not heal us apart from our story. He heals us through and in the midst of our story. He is not a fairy godmother who taps us with a magic wand so that we instantly become Cinderella. He is a Potter who patiently molds us, as we are His clay. He is a Refiner, removing the dross from our lives in order to refine our gold. He is Immanuel, God with us! And the more that we are able to see our story entwined with His story, the more peace and joy we will have in believing. 

So how do we get there from here? How do we see the bigger picture and come to know the peace and joy that God wills to bring to our lives? That answer is found in the most famous verse of the Bible that most everyone seems to know. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only Begotten Son, that whosoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life.” But knowing it and living into it are two separate things. So let’s key in on four critical verbs so that we can live into this truth. The verbs are “loved,” “gave,”, “believe,” and “have.”

When I was 18 years old, and a freshman in college, a guy that I had never met before sat down next to me in the school cafeteria and asked me this question, “Did you know that God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life?” I was raised in church and yet that question hit me like a ton of bricks. I knew that God so loved the world but it never occurred to me that he loved Ray Kasch. And what was even more mindboggling was the thought that He would have a plan for my life. That happened nearly 50 years ago and I can testify to you that what he said was true. His plan for my life has been wonderful. At times it has been like Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride at Disneyworld, but it has been wonderful. 

God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life. That knowledge is what will keep you on course. Every time you hear “For God so loved the world” replace “world” with your name. And be assured that your life is not just a compilation of random circumstance or a product of luck or a consequence of fate. The Father that loves you, has sent His Son to enter your world, and make your life a part of His eternal, wonderful plan.

“For God so loved…that He gave…” That last word is beautiful. He didn’t so love that He “required.” He didn’t so love the world that He“dictated.” He didn’t so love the world that He “threatened.” Of course as the Almighty He could have done so but He didn’t. He so loved that He “gave” because when you love someone you give them a gift. And this precious gift tells us a lot about Him as well as a lot about us. 

This gift tells us a lot about Him when we consider what manner of gift it is that He gave. When we look upon this Christ child we don’t think to ourselves, “He went to Jared’s.” Rather we fall on our knees in wonder and awe, that the Word would become flesh and dwell among us. While we will never fully comprehend such a gift it should cause us to never doubt the Father’s love. 

This gift also tells us about ourselves. The value of something is what others are willing to pay for it. A lump of coal is worth a few cents. But take a lump of carbon, put it under extreme pressure and temperature for about 3 billion years and it becomes a diamond and folks will pay thousands of dollars for it. Its worth is determined by what folks will pay for it. 

What God was willing to pay in order for you to become His child is a good indication of your worth to Him. This too is a mystery that we will never be able to wrap our minds around but it also tells you why He does have a wonderful plan for your life. He paid too high a price for you to let your life go to waste. Of course you can choose to waste it if you want but that is not His plan. Jesus said, “I have come that you might have life and have it abundantly.”

“That whosoever believes in Him….”As most of you know when the Bible speaks of “belief” it is much more than simply acknowledging a fact. You can intellectually acknowledge that Jesus is the Son of God but that is not “belief” in the biblical sense. St. James points out in his Epistle that belief that is only acknowledgment is worthless. He says even “the demons believe and they tremble.”  Biblical belief in Jesus Christ means to place your full trust in and reliance upon Him. 

A tightrope walker walks a wheelbarrow on a tightrope stretched over a 1000-foot chasm. Then he turns around and comes back. He says “Do you believe that I can walk this wheelbarrow across this tightrope and back.” Because you just witnessed it you say, “Of course.” The he says to you “Get in the wheelbarrow.” True belief requires a commitment to the Lordship of Christ. When Bishop Frank confirms folks he says to them. “Remember you are not your own, you were bought with a price.” That is the consequence of belief and that is what makes the difference between perishing and having eternal life. 

This leads us to the last verb “have.” This is the icing on the cake of the Good News. Note that the text does not say, “will one day have eternal life.” If it were true that eternal life was something that we only experience in the future then that would make this life no more than a waiting room. But that is not the case. Jesus said, “Repent for the kingdom of God is at hand.” When we believe in Him, when we put our trust in His love and goodness then we HAVE eternal life and we have it now! We are cleansed from our sins now! We pass from death to life now! We change from being aliens to being His children now! We receive His Spirit to walk in newness of life now!

One of the signs that eternal life is something that you have now is, as St. Paul said, becoming “zealous for good works.” When Christ is truly Lord then you not only forsake any lawlessness that you may have been walking in but you get out of yourself and start to have God’s heart for others. You long to see God make things right in the world and you seek to become His hands and feet to make that happen. 

This Advent we had the honor of hearing from a remarkable lady named Ronda Paulson who became zealous for good works when her heart was broken over the plight of kids entering the foster care system. She saw something that was broken and instead of just complaining about it she became God’s agent for change. I won’t take the time to tell her story now but you can find it on YouTube by searching Isiaah117house. You will see through her story how God folded her into His story in order to reach those whom He loves. He can to the same with you. 

I saw a very convicting post that said, “Someone somewhere is depending on you to do what God has called you to do.” Each of us who are called by His Name are called to be a part of the peace on earth and good will towards men that was ushered in by the birth of Jesus. Be zealous for good works. You will find your life immeasurably enriched if you do so. Winston Churchill said it best. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”  

“For God so loved the world.” For God so loved you! May you know the peace and joy of that Good News. Merry Christmas. 

Lessons from Joseph and Mary

St. Paul writes to the Church in Corinth, “For as in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive.”In light of our Gospel lesson this morning I want to paraphrase the blessed Apostle and say, “For as through the first family paradise is lost, so through the Holy Family paradise is restored.” This story of Joseph and Mary is truly remarkable and the effect of their story on our lives today is beyond calculation. And yet is all too easy to brush past this story, so let’s slow down and take a closer look.

“Now the birth of Jesus Christ took place in this way. When his mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph, before they came together she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit.”  There is a whole lot going on with those two sentences. Let me begin unpacking it by giving you some cultural background to betrothal and marriage in ancient Israel.  

If they were typical of their day, Joseph and Mary would have been betrothed when she was a teenager and it would not have been unusual for Joseph to be slightly older. Marriages in their day were a three-step process. In the first step, the parents arranged the marriage. This involved a dowry. When the financial arrangements had been made then a betrothal was announced. Step two, was the couple spending a year setting up their house and preparing for the actual wedding. At this point they did not live together, and in many cases they were not even allowed to be together alone. Nonetheless they were considered so bound to each other that to break it off, they had to seek a divorce. Additionally it was considered to be adultery if either one was unfaithful during their betrothal. 

The third stage of the marriage was a weeklong party and finally the consummation of the marriage. Joseph and Mary were in stage two, being considered essentially husband and wife, setting up house but not consummating the union. Like all young people they had to be filled with hopes and dreams but among all of their hopes and dreams they would not in a million years have guessed the path that God had prepared for them. 

An angel of the Lord visits Mary to tell her that a miraculous conception would take place, but Joseph evidently is left in the dark. Either that or Mary told Joseph but he wasn’t listening. Anyway, Mary goes off to visit her cousin Elizabeth and when she returns later, Joseph sees that she is obviously with child but knows that the child was not his.

At this point Joseph had a couple of choices. He could take her before the elders and have her disgraced for adultery, or he could quietly brake off the engagement and try to pick up the pieces of his life. He had to be completely heartbroken at what he must have thought to be a betrayal of his trust. And if he were at all a typical man then he would have been humiliated that another man had seduced his fiancée. 

But because he was a just man Joseph did not seek revenge. Instead he was going to quietly break things off until an angel of the Lord visited him and told him about a third option. He assured Joseph that Mary did not betray him but that her pregnancy was a miracle. Joseph was to marry her and become a stepfather or if you like a foster parent. What’s more, Joseph was even denied the normal right of naming his son, because the angel told him what He was to be named. The Lord was asking a lot of Joseph and of Mary.

What was their response? They both did as God called them to do without a care for either their own dreams or the expectations of others. Now I’m sure that the story has been compressed, and since they were real people, they had to have days where they wondered if they had lost their minds. But in the end they yielded their lives to God and this lead to the salvation of the world. Consider for a moment what a model this couple is to each of us and what a contrast they are to the first couple. 

Mary hears the Word of the Lord and responds by saying “Behold I am the servant of the Lord. Let it be done to me according to thy Word.” By contrast Eve doubted God’s Word. When the serpent said, “Did God really say…?” she went right along with that question. 

This tactic of the enemy did not stop with Eve. As you well know that is how it begins with every church that has gone apostate. It begins by doubting what God said rather than being like Mary and submitting to His Word.

Another contrast is Mary’s humility verses Eve’s pride. Mary accepts the word of the angel and submits, while Eve listens to the serpent and desires the knowledge of good and evil. Mary seeks to obey God while Eve seeks to be God. 

Again we see Eve’s sin as a mark of heretical bodies today. Rather than seeking change and transformation through God’s grace, the false prophet preaches a god in their own image. They do this in order to affirm people’s sins rather than calling them to repentance. Mary shows us a better way by yielding her will to the will of God. 

The contrast between the two husbands is equally significant. Joseph steps up to the plate and becomes a husband/protector. He protects Mary from disgrace by marrying her and later he will protect his family from Herod by leading them to Egypt. Adam on the other hand failed in his calling as husband/protector. Have you ever noticed that just after Eve eats the forbidden fruit the text says “and she also gave some to her husband who was with her and he ate.”  Who was with her? You mean he stood by while the serpent deceived his wife, watched her eat the forbidden fruit and then receive it from her hand? He should have gone redneck on the serpent and led his wife as far away from the tree as he possibly could. Adam failed as a leader and partner because he was passive. Joseph took action because he had heard from God and took his place as the protector of his family.

The other quality of a husband/protector that Joseph demonstrated is that he was led by God’s direction rather than by his personal desires. Why did Adam and Eve end up eating the fruit? The text says, “So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took the fruit and ate…”  So in essence they gave up their relationship with God and were kicked out of paradise because the fruit looked good and because they wanted to be like God. They lost everything because of carnal desires and pride.

Joseph however put his ego and desires in check. The Gospel says, “When Joseph woke from sleep he did as the angel of the Lord commanded him: he took his wife, but knew her notuntil she had given birth to a son. And he call his name Jesus.” Joseph did not demand his rights as a husband. He did not put his needs first. Instead, in obedience to God, and as husband/protector, he ensured the Virgin birth of Jesus Christ. And please understand that the importance of the Virgin birth of Jesus Christ cannot be over stated. 

“Born of the Virgin Mary”is not a filler line in the middle of the Apostles’ Creed. Rather it is a pivotal line without which everything that follows in the Creed would not be possible. If Jesus were a result of a natural conception and a natural birth, then He would merely be a son of Adam.  As a son of Adam He would not only have been tempted as all of us are, but He also would have sinned as all of us do who are sons of Adam. If He were a son of Adam then His death on the cross would have been for the wages of His own sins and not for the sins of the world. We would still be dead in our transgressions. If He were a son of Adam then His body would still be in the grave and we would have no hope of resurrection for ourselves or for those we love. If He were a son of Adam then we would not be able to look with hopeful expectation for His triumphal return. There wouldn’t be one. Instead we would be asking the mountains to fall on us to avoid the judgment day of the Lord. If He were a son of Adam then there would be no life everlasting and in the end it would not matter in this life if you were a saint or a serial killer because we would all go down to the same grave. 

But He is conceived by the Holy Ghost and born of the Virgin Mary; He is the Son of the Most High. As the Son of God He will be able to fulfill His name, JESUS, and save His people from their sins. Because He the Son of God He will live a sinless life, die as a propitiation for our sins, be raised from the dead and one day return in power and great glory to Judge the quick and the dead. Because He the Son of God He will do all that He promised including preparing a place for us in eternity. Because He is the Son of God death does not win in the end. We will be given new bodies to live in a new heaven and a new earth and we will be with Him and those we love forever. Because He is the Son of God you had better believe that it makes a difference if you are a saint or a serial killer because one day each of us will stand before Him to give an accounting for our lives.

The story of Joseph and Mary is truly a remarkable story. They came from a tiny town in the hills of Galilee from which no one expected anything. You will recall that when Philip told Nathanial that they had found the Messiah, Philip asked, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” They were not powerful political people. They were not academic elites. They were not from a family dynasty like the Rockefellers or the Kennedys. Joseph was a simple carpenter and Mary a teenage maiden. They were blue-collar folk from the hills. They could just as well been from East Tennessee and yet these are the ones whom God chose as agents to bring salvation to the world.

Obviously they have a unique place in salvation history and no one will ever be called upon again to do what they did. However, their example of humility and obedience should stand before each of us all of the time. They stand as an illustration that that you don’t have to be someone special or have spectacular gifts for God to use you. You just have to be available and say “yes.”  

This penitential season of Advent is coming to an end. In just a couple of days we will celebrate the most wonderful mystery of all mysteries, that God would become flesh and dwell among us. He comes “to save us all from Satan’s power when were gone astray”. Those truly are “tidings of comfort and joy.” But it is also a two-pronged celebration in that we who are now heirs in Him not only celebrate His birth but also look with joyful anticipation to His coming again.  Because of His grace, because of His GRACE “we may without shame of fear rejoice to behold His appearing.” May God bless your final preparations as you await the birth of our Savior. Amen. 

Good and Faithful Servant

Imagine that you work for an International Company and they gave you an assignment to spend a few months at an overseas branch. A close friend of yours has had a change in his living arrangements and so he volunteered to housesit while you are gone. After being away longer than originally expected, you return to your home only to find it a complete mess. The yard is overgrown, the gutters are full of leaves and the inside is even in worse condition. The carpets are all stained, the trash is overflowing and stinks, there are empty food containers everywhere, and your previously beautiful dining room table, that you inherited from your grandmother, is covered in scratches and water marks. Besides being furious it would also make you wonder two things 1. If your friend really believed that you were coming back. And 2. If he is really your friend.

Jesus’ parables remind us again and again that we are not owners. Even the things that we think are ours, come from Him and are ultimately His. We are just housesitting. His parables also remind us again and again that we will have to give an account for how well we kept His house. Therefore the words that we should be living to hear one day are “Well done good and faithful servant. You have been faithful over a little. I will set you over much. Enter into the joy of your Master.” In order to hear those words we need to be clear about what we believe and about how we should live. 

What do we believe? We say it every week in the Nicene Creed. “….and he shall come again, with glory, to judge both the quick and the dead, whose kingdom shall have no end.” We see today in Matthew’s Gospel a snapshot of what that will look like. “and they will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory.  And he will send out his angels with a loud trumpet call, and they will gather his elect from the four winds, from one end of heaven to the other.”His return will not be a secret. It will be obvious to all and He bring with Him all of the company of heaven. 

What will happen to those who are still alive at His return? Verse 38 “For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and they were unaware until the flood came and swept them all away, so will be the coming of the Son of Man. Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and one left. Two women will be grinding at the mill; one will be taken and one left. Therefore, stay awake, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming.”

For any who are still alive everything will change in a blink of an eye. But when you read this passage in its context you see that the Left Behind teaching about the so-called Rapture has it completely backwards. Matthew points out that in the days of Noah it was the wicked that were swept away and it was Noah and his family that were left behind. In Luke’s version of this passage the disciples even ask where they are taken and Jesus’ response is “where the corpse is, there the vultures will gather.” That doesn’t sound like a place I would want to be. The Lord sweeping away the wicked, as He did with the flood, will result in the meek inheriting the earth. So Christians need a bumper sticker that instead of “In case of rapture this car will be unmanned” will say, “In case of rapture, may I have your car?”

If we truly believe that He is going to return and that we will be called upon to give an accounting of our stewardship, then that belief should have a profound impact on how we live our lives. Jesus said, “To whom much is given, much will be required.” Thus it would be wise for each of us to ask, “What markers in my life would identify me as a good and faithful servant?” The Scriptures point to several.

A first and most obvious mark of being a good and faithful servant is that you have only one Master. We read in our lesson from Romans “Owe no one anything, except to love each other….” This practical command has profound spiritual implications. Why? Because following this command secures our freedom as Proverbs 22 tells us, “the borrower is slave to the lender.” Add to that Jesus’ words, “No one can serve two Masters… you cannot serve God and money.” Ultimately how we use or misuse our money has a direct impact on who or what rules our lives.

I recently heard the saddest call on a Dave Ramsey podcast. A guy called in who had completed all the years of college and medical school but he failed the comprehensive exams three times and was expelled from school. He had $400,000 in student loan debt and was currently employed as a high school science teacher. Dave tried a number of avenues to help him but it was clear to me that this borrower would be a slave to Fannie Mae forever.

But when you owe no one anything, when you finally kick MasterCard out of your life, then you have only one Master and you are free to follow wherever He leads. He can call you to the mission field, He can call you to seminary, He can call you to be a chicken farmer and because you are free you can answer His call. 

A second mark of being a good and faithful servant is living in a state of readiness. Jesus is unequivocal that no one knows when the Day of Judgment will arrive. He says “But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father only.” So any time you see a preacher pull out a chart or claim to have a biblical formula for figuring out the datejust say “Bless your heart” and move on. 

But it is precisely because we don’t know the day or hour that we are to live in a state of readiness. We are to live as if His return could be any day, perhaps even today. That was Jesus’ point when He spoke of the people in the days of Noah eating and drinking and marrying and giving in marriage. It’s not that there is anything innately wrong with eating and drinking and marrying. What Jesus was pointing out was that they were clueless. A great flood was about to come and they were living like they didn’t have a care in the world. 

Do we have this condition today? Consider Sundays in America where our churches are half full but our sports stadiums are overflowing and the Wal-Mart is packed. I’ll never forget, when we were still meeting at Lancaster Academy, driving to church on a crisp Easter Morning. As I drove past the Wal-Mart I saw enough cars to fill about 3 churches. On Easter morning! Or consider that this year we spent $8.8 billion on Halloween while 1 in 7 kids in America does not know where his next meal is coming from. What Jesus was pointing out is that when you are clueless your priorities are catawampus, so get a clue…wake up…pay attention!

I think that it is important, however, to distinguish between living in a state of awareness and living in a state of fear. Jesus says “Therefore stay awake” He does not say “Therefore stay afraid.” We are not meant to live as if the sword of judgment is hanging over our head, because it isn’t. Jesus’ atonement has removed that sword. But we are, as a collect from Morning Prayer puts it, to remember that we are ever walking in His sight. St. Paul also uses the image of being awake when he says, “the hour has come for you to wake from sleep….the night is far gone; the day is at hand.” We are to wake up and stay awake and live in a state of readiness.

A third mark of a good and faithful servant is that they live according the Master’s rules. Do you remember when you were a kid and you said to your parents, “Well at Johnny’s house they let him do thus and so…” What was the universal parent response? “Well this isn’t Johnny’s house and as long as you live under my roof you will follow my rules.”

That needs to be our mentality as Christians. It doesn’t matter what they are doing in the world, our citizenship is in heaven and so we are to follow His rules. In verse 13 St. Paul describes how the world lives and it’s not pretty. Orgies, drunkenness, sexual immorality, sensuality, quarrelling, jealousy. That is chaos. That is darkness. St. Paul says that we not to live this way. He says “Let us walk properly as in the daytime.”

Following the Master’s rules should inform not only our personal ethics but also our social ethics. It doesn’t matter how many times the Supreme Court says something is constitutional or how many laws the Legislator pass, something that is wicked cannot be made righteous just because it’s now legal. 

There needs to be a consistency between what we believe personally and our public voice, particularly on major moral issues. The Church should stay out of politics but the individual Christian should be a leading voice. I think of William Wilberforce who became the tip of the spear to abolish slavery in Great Britain in 1807. And don’t listen to the old saw about keeping your beliefs to yourself and not imposing them on others. If you are silent they will impose theirs on you. You are the salt of the earth. Be that salt. Can you imagine someone in the 1940’s saying, “Well I am personally opposed to the extermination of the Jews but who am I to impose my beliefs on the German government?” German Lutheran Pastor and Martyr, Dietrich Bonheoffer, is a model for standing against wickedness no matter the cost.

Finally a fourth mark of a good and faithful servant is that they follow the Master so closely that they become an extension of the Master. How do we do that? In verse 14 St. Paul says, “But put on Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires.”

Fr. Chris and I have laughed many times over a YouTube video of a frustrated preacher rebuking his congregation. He yells, “You guys….don’t be a jerk…you’re making me look bad in front of God. O look it’s Jesus. What does He say? “Stop it!’”” 

While the video is funny the sad truth is too often that “just stop it” approach is how many Christians live. They make a long laundry list of things they are not supposed to do and they work on that list. That works about as well as the past government campaign to stop drug use by “just say no.” It doesn’t work because your dominant focus becomes the very thing that you are not supposed to be doing. If I said, “please don’t think about a pink elephant” then you will immediately think of a pink elephant. 

St. Paul points us in a more positive direction. He shows us a way to live under grace rather than under the law. He not just what not to do but he tells us to put on Christ. One commentator said of this expression, “The metaphor of putting on clothing implies more than just imitating Christ’s character but also living in close personal fellowship with Him.” (ESV footnotes p.2180). 

How do we live in close personal fellowship with Christ? Obviously we do it through the reading and study of the Scriptures, through prayer, and through the Sacraments. But there are a couple of other means of grace that I would like to underscore.

First we live in close personal fellowship with Christ as we maintain close personal fellowship with one another. You are His Body and that is why we need one another. If you hang around godly people you become more godly. The opposite is also true. In 1 Corinthians we read, “Bad company corrupts good character.” So Christian fellowship is key.

Another way to stay in close personal fellowship with Christ has been shown to us by our spiritual ancestors. During the Middle Ages there was a very popular devotional book called the Book of Hours. It was written for the laity but patterned after the Divine Offices that were observed in the monasteries. The idea was to stop at various times throughout the day to offer private prayers and to reflect on the life of Christ. This is the kind of pattern that Dorrence and Kelly Stoval keep as third order Benedictines. They could tell you more about it. 

But also know that you don’t have to join an order to keep this discipline. The 1979 and the 2019 Books of Common Prayer have brief devotions that can be done throughout the day; Morning, Midday, Early Evening and at the Close of Day as well as Compline. The pattern is to stop at various times throughout the day to refocus on Christ and say some brief prayers. It is a way, as Brother Lawrence put it, to practice the presence of Christ.

We believe that He will come again and when He does that we will have to give an accounting for what kind of stewards we have been. In the wisdom of the Church this penitential season of Advent is designed for us to ask ourselves the hard questions and to seek His grace to make the necessary changes to be good and faithful servants. But please note, and this is key, it is a work that we do not do FOR Him, it’s a work that we do WITH Him. St. Paul writes, “For I am confident of this very thing, that He who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.” May that day come soon. Amen.