A Bruised Reed He Will Not Break

1st Sunday after Epiphany  A                   St. Patrick’s                    January 12, 2020

I’m sure that most of you have had the experience of reading or hearing a verse of Holy Scripture that seem to really connect with your soul. That has been my experience with a passage from today’s Old Testament Lesson in Isaiah, “A bruised reed he will not break, and a dimly burning wick he will not quench.”The last part is even more poetic in the King James Version; “…the smoking flax he shall not quench.” It is such a comforting promise.

This promise in its context is a prophecy of the Messiah, telling us of the Messiah’s very nature. We discover in this passage, as we pray in the Prayer of Humble Access, that “his property is always to have mercy.

“A bruised reed he will not break….”When the Scriptures talk about the mighty and the powerful, it sometimes uses the analogy of trees, like the Cedars of Lebanon or the tree firmly planted by streams of water in Psalm 1. By contrast, this prophecy speaks of a slender, wispy plant that grows on the edge of a swamp. A plant easily damaged by wind and rain and the forces of nature. 

The image here is of those who are poor or those who lack power or those who have been dealt harsh blows by life. It refers to those who are hurting and vulnerable. In Darwin’s survival of the fittest world, these are the ones outside of the herd that get picked off by the scavengers. And good riddance because all they do is weaken the gene pool. If the weak are taken from the tribe it only makes the tribe stronger. Right? And as most of you know we live in a Darwin world 

Over the years I have counseled with folks in their 50’s and 60’s who have been let go of a job, through no fault of their own. As they seek a new job they discover it to be a soul racking experience. Rather than wanting these men and women for their wisdom and experience, companies seek younger people who are cheaper to hire and have more curb appeal. Too often in our society if you show weakness or vulnerability you can see the vultures begin to circle overhead. One of our societal laws is “Never let them see you sweat.” 

The prophet is telling us that our God is not like this. His kingdom is not a Darwinian nightmare. When God finds us bruised He does not break us, He heals us. 

We see this at the very beginning of the story. Adam and Eve sinned against God by disobeying Him and eating of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, what was the first thing that God did? He killed some animals and he clothed them so that they would no longer be ashamed. This foreshadows when God will slay the Lamb of God to cover our sin and shame and clothes us in Christ’s righteousness. 

Additionally while driving them from the garden was surely punishment, we can also see this as an act of mercy, of not breaking the bruised reed. This is so because there was another tree in that garden, the tree of eternal life. If God had allowed them to remain in the garden after they had separated themselves from Him through disobedience, and if they had eaten of the tree of eternal life, then they and wewould have been separated from God for eternity. He chastened them, not to break them, but ultimately to bring human kind back. He did not break a bruised reed.

We also see this kind of compassion all through the life and ministry of Jesus, which is birthed in His humility. Note that He did not have Himself declared the Messiah of the world by being anointed in the Temple in Jerusalem. Rather He humbled Himself and went out into the desert to be baptized by a bizarre prophet. He did this to fulfill all righteousness. And His baptism opened the door to all who would be baptized in His Name. And this would be revolutionary because it would include male and female, Jew and Greek, slave and free.

And what of His miracles? His very first one is to save a young couple from embarrassment because they ran out of wine at their wedding. He gives a woman back her only son from death. He heals a man who is blind all of his life. He heals a woman who had run out of doctors and money. They were small miracles on the grand scheme of things, but not small miracles to each of the individuals that He touched. These were bruised reeds that were ready to break and He strengthened them. 

These tell us volumes about God’s nature and it tells us why He is so worthy of our trust. It may be true that you cannot let others see you sweat, but it is not so with God. He is the very one we can come to with our brokenness and weaknesses and fears to and we know that He will not break us. Jesus said, “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me to bind up the broken hearted…”That is what He has entered our lives to do.

“smoking flax he will not quench”.Here the image is of a lamp that is running out of oil and so the flame is almost gone out. This analogy has to do with matters of faith and hope. What is God’s disposition towards us when, for whatever reason, our faith or our hope is all but extinguished? 

Gratefully He does not respond like churches today. In too many it is deadly to say that you are wrestling with faith. You might as well as have declared yourself a leper. It is a refreshing tenet of Anglicanism, because we see this life as a journey into Truth, we do not expect anyone to have it all figured out on this side of glory. Because of that we end up attracting folks who have received the left foot of fellowship from other Churches who do not want doubters in their midst. 

We have received this perspective from the Jewish religion that believes that wrestling with God, as itself an act of faith. If you are wrestling with someone then you must believe that there is a Someone with whom to wrestle. I have met people who are no longer growing and learning because they think they have arrived. Maybe they have but it is also true that people no longer grow or learn when they are spiritually dead. The Pharisees called themselves doctors of the law. Jesus called them tombs, whitewashed sepulchers. 

We can be very thankful that God’s disposition is to blow on the embers that you have left until they become a flame again. This too we see this so clearly in the life and ministry of Jesus. There were a few spiritual giants around Him, like the Anna and Simeon who waited for years to see Him. But the vast majority of his original followers were not bright flames. Even the disciple seem to get it and then you read a few chapters later and they do or say something that shows that they don’t get it after all. Most if not all of the people who came to Him, didn’t do so because they perfectly understood who He was. They came because He gave them a glimpse of hope. 

I take great comfort in that very honest exchange in St. Mark’s Gospel, where the father of a possessed boy comes to Jesus. He explains the boy’s affliction and says, “But if you can do anything, take pity on us and help us!”  And Jesus said to him, “If you can! All things are possible to him who believes.”The boy’s father cried out “I do believe, help my unbelief.”Then Jesus healed the boy. 

What a great and honest prayer. We too should pray it. Don’t hold back because you don’t believe that you have enough faith. Just offer what you have. It’s like that little boy who offered Him a few loaves and fish. Look what Jesus did with that offering!

And please note that if your light has all but gone out, the answer is not to try harder or to be more disciplined. The answer is to get more oil. If your light is almost out pray for more of the Holy Spirit. God will answer that prayer. Jesus said, “If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”

We prayed in today’s collect that we would be faithful as adopted children. One sure way to be faithful it to become more and more like the Father who adopted us. If it is not God’s nature to break a bruised reed or to put out a dim light, then it should be against our nature as well. That can have many applications and I will leave it to you to make those but allow me to give you a couple of suggestions to start the ball rolling.

First is that we should resist the temptation to engage in the emotional pile-ons that are so prominent in our culture. There is this strange inclination in our culture that when others, and particularly those of prominence, topple or fall, we seem to revel in their tragedy. We read the tabloids or get on social media to find all of the juicy tidbits. Then we talk about how we never trusted them to begin with or remark how they had it coming. 

Proverbs says, “Do not rejoice when your enemy falls, and do not let your heart be glad when he stumbles, lest the Lord see it and be displeased…”(Prov. 24:17). If that is how we are to treat our enemies then how much more should we use caution in how we treat one another?        

A priest that mentored me when I was a deacon experienced a fall from grace and was removed from his parish by his bishop. Priests do have recourse if they have been falsely accused but since no recourse was taken most just trusted the bishop’s decision. One Sunday the priest was there and the next Sunday a supply priest was in his place. To this day no one, including me knows exactly what happened. 

This is quite a contrast to a priest in Florida that was recently removed. His bishop publically released a 30-page document that included all the gory details. A link to it made the front page in the local paper and a friend who lives in that town said that non Christian forces were reveling in the priest’s fall. 

The Scripture says that “love covers a multitude of sins.” It does not approve of sin but love does not allow you to break a bruised reed. The Church is not to shoot its wounded it is to heal it. The Church makes a mistake when it seeks the counsel of lawyers over the counsel of Holy Scripture. 

A second application has to do with living generously toward others. Since it is God’s inclination to reach out, especially to the downtrodden, it should be ours as well. The Church has historically been concerned about the downtrodden not because she feels guilty but because she is trying to make a political statement but because she has seen it as a part of the Gospel. It is our vocation. This is not a conservative or liberal issue. This is a gospel issue. St. John Chrysostom, a 4thcentury Bishop said, “Do you want to honor Christ’s body? Then do not…honor him here in the church with silken garments while neglecting him outside where he is cold and naked.” You can see in history that when the Church is only focused upon itself it becomes very ill but when it focused on the needs of others, it is at its healthiest. That is so for us as individuals as well.  If you will live a generous life you will be blessed beyond measure.

Jesus does indeed fit the profile that the prophet gives us. He did not break a bruised reed and He did not quench a smoldering flax. Just the opposite. And some of you have had first hand experien with God’s mercy. You have once been a bruised reed or a smoldering flax and God’s grace has entered your life and made you new. But here is the deal. There is a world out there that does not know that about God and so it is up to each of us to tell them and to show them that by demonstrating His mercy and grace in our lives. Amen.