Blessed are…

 Imagine that you are a first century Jew and that all of your life you have heard the story of Moses on the mountain delivering the law in 10 pithy statements. You were taught that God intended you to follow His commandments so that you would live life well. Further you knew that keeping these laws made you the unique people, separate from the world, unlike the pagans with their many gods and endless idols and their dissolute living.

Now you have heard about this young Rabbi from Nazareth who teaches with authority unlike anyone has seen or heard. Some are even suggesting that He could be the promised Messiah, so you go out to see for yourself. 

A large crowd gathers and sitting on a mount He delivers 9 pithy statements. Your mind is filled with questions. Is He a new Moses? Would following His teachings show us how God intends life to be lived? Would following His teachings make us a peculiar people? But how can one possibly consider themselves blessed if they are poor, or it they are in mourning, or if they are persecuted? 

Today we try to tame the Beatitudes. When I managed a Christian bookstore we sold plaques with the Beatitudes over peaceful scenes of sunsets or mountain lakes. But I do not think that this is how Jesus wanted us them or us to perceive them that way. The Beatitudes is not pastoral advice even though it does show us the way to true happiness. They are a King describing His Kingdom and putting life as we know it on its head. This is the King challenging us to follow Him no matter the cost.

Most of you will know that the word “blessed” can also be interpreted “happy.” But of course Jesus’ meaning of happiness is very different from that of the world’s. Tonight during the Super Bowl businesses will spend millions of dollars for a 30 second ad to convince you that you will be happy if you will buy their product. And it must work otherwise those companies would not spend that kind of money. But will it produce real happiness? You know the answer to that.

I said earlier that Jesus’ teaching puts life as we know it on its head. It certainly would have done so for the people of His day. The teachers of Jesus’ day in one sense taught a Jewish form of the health and wealth Gospel. How do you know that you are blessed? Because you are rich. Why are you sick? Because you have sinned. How do you become favored by God? By being righteous. So for most of the people that Jesus calls blessed in this list a Pharisee would have prayed in the temple thanking God that he was not like one of them. And it almost goes without saying that secular people would not want to have anything to do with the people about whom Jesus is speaking. 

Let’s look at the first beatitude. “Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of God.” This first line is the key that opens our understanding for all of the other beatitudes. It tells us that we will find real happiness when we enter Gods’ kingdom and this is how we enter the door. Jesus is talking here about our spiritual condition not our financial condition. Blessed are the poor in spirit.

Again, Pharisee would not consider a person who is poor in spirit to be blessed and he certainly would not have believed that they would inherit the kingdom of God. So why does Jesus proclaim this?

Let me draw an analogy from Alcoholics Anonymous. They correctly teach that most folks will not change until they hit rock bottom. They will try to change for all the wrong reasons but they will not get well until they realize that they are going to die if they do not change. Others wait until they have lost everything and the only way to go is up. So when someone in AA sees someone hit rock bottom they know that is the best thing that could have happened to them because now they are going to get well. 

In a similar vein Jesus tells us that we will not enter the kingdom of God until we have come to the end of ourselves. When Jesus spoke of saving people from their sins the Scribes and Pharisees and many Americans don’t see the need because they did not see themselves as sinners. So Jesus’ response was that He was like a physician who came not for the well but for the sick. Of course the sad reality is that we are all sick but some folks don’t realize that fact. Jesus promises that when we finally do understand that we are sick and come to the Physician He will heal us. So blessed are the sick. Blessed are the poor in spirit.  

 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted”. God indeed promises in Scripture to comfort those who mourn due to death. But if we understand His meaning here as mourning in spirit, then we see its connection to the first Beatitude. When we realize the grievousness of our sins, we experience godly contrition and we mourn over time and opportunities that have been lost. We mourn the damage that we have done to others and ourselves because of our sins. 

In a few short weeks we will enter the season of Lent. Throughout the history of the Church this has been the time to embrace these first two beatitudes. It is a penitential season where we take stock of our lives and seek God’s grace to make the necessary amendments of life. But here is the incredibly good news. Just as Lent is followed by Easter, so those who mourn over their spiritual poverty and lost opportunities will receive not only the comfort of forgiveness but God promises to restore what has been lost. That is how our mourning turns into dancing. Hear this beautiful promise from the prophet Joel. God says “So I will restore to you the years that the swarming locust has eaten…and my people shall never be put to shame.’”  God makes all things new so that we do not have to spend our lives in grief and regret. And even if you have wasted an entire life, if you turn to Him in repentance, then He will give you an eternity without shame. You never have to look back.

 “Blessed are the meek for they will inherit the earth.” This is a great example of how this sermon is more than pastoral advice but a blueprint for revolution. It flies in the face of common thinking. The systems of the world say, “Blessed are the strong for they will conquer the earth.” The people of Jesus’ day knew that well. They were under that Pax Romana that was won with a sword. In fact very empire before and after Rome has also ruled with the sword. But Jesus’ kingdom is not set up that way. He claims that it is the meek and not the sword that will win the day

Some modern translations translate “meekness” as “gentleness” which is also a fruit of the Spirit. And yet gentleness can also be misunderstood as a call to become a doormat to the world. So I love how one commentator described meekness. It“is the characteristic that makes a man bow low before God in order that he may stand high before other men.” (James Boice, The Sermon on the Mount, Zondervan Pub., 1972, p38). 

We certainly see this quality in Jesus. He had the courage of conviction that came not only from His divinity but also from submitting Himself to the will of the Father. And you would make a mistake if you confused His gentleness with being spineless. He was no man-pleaser. He faced down Pilate and the Jewish leaders and was singularly led by the will of God. 

If we will be gentle like Jesus will we inherit the earth? Consider this. We are told that most of the empires in history have not remained in power more than 200 years yet here we are 2,000 years later listening to the words of our King and working for the spread of His kingdom. We already are inheriting the earth! 

 “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they will be filled.”Just as the first beatitude was about a spiritual poverty so this one is about a spiritual hunger and thirst. There are two reasons why such a person is blessed. 

First is because spiritual hunger and thirst is a gift of the Holy Spirit. It is a sign of a spiritual awakening when you are eager to feed on God’s Word, when you long to worship, when seeking the kingdom becomes your highest priority. Spiritual thirst and hunger is a good thing. A 19thcentury preacher said, “When the prodigal son was hungry he fed upon husks but when he was starving he turned to his father.”

 Secondly such a person is blessed because Jesus promises to fill their longings and what He gives them is not a temporary fix. Jesus said to the woman at the well, “Everyone who drinks of this water will thirst again, but whoever drinks of the water that I will give will never thirst again.”

I hope that you can see the pattern here and therefore can unpack the other Beatitudes for yourself so I will skip to the last one. “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” This is a difficult truth to hear but it is still the truth. We can expect to be persecuted because, as Jesus said, the servant is not above his Master and since they persecuted our Master we should not be surprised when they come after us. 

We will be persecuted because the kingdom of God by its nature comes into conflict with the systems of this world. A number of years ago I saw a play that was the gospel in modern times called Christ in the Concrete City. In the scene where Pilate asks who he is to set free, Jesus or Barabbas, the crowd cries out, “Give us Barabbas. His ways are our ways. Give us Barabbas… our lives are not offended by his holiness.” 

This weekend the Church around the world have been praying specifically for Nigeria. 6,000 Nigerian Christians have been murdered by Islamist militants since 2015 and the world is silent. So it us up to the Church to raise awareness. It is up to the Church to call for action. It is up to the Church to pray. 

But how does such opposition grant us the kingdom? It does so by our response to it. I read once of the great Church father St. Tertullian counseling a tradesman who was tempted to compromise his faith because the pagans would not do business with a Christian. “What must I do?”he asked Tertullian, “I must live!”Tertullian replied, “Must you?”When we by God’s grace are able to love those who hate us and pray for those who persecute us it shows that Christ is in our lives in a real and meaningful way. It shows that we are already walking in the kingdom of God. 

As I have studied the Beatitudes I have seen a vein that runs through them. That vein is a call to humility. And that makes sense since the Giver of the Beatitudes humbled Himself and became a servant. 

I came across the Litany of Humility and have found it to be a convicting but profound prayer so I wanted to share it with you. As we grow in humility we will not only understand the Beatitudes but we will become the Beatitudes. We will live life as God intended life to be lived. And as Anglicans, who already are a peculiar people, we will become more so. Amen. 

          The Litany of Humility

O Jesus meek and humble of heart, 

Hear me. 

From the desire of being esteemed, 

Deliver, me, Jesus.

From the desire of being loved, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being extolled, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being honored, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being praised, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being preferred to others, 

Deliver me Jesus.

From the desire of being consulted, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being approved, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being humiliated, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being despised, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of suffering rebukes, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being calumniated, 

Deliver, me, Jesus.

From the fear of being forgotten, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being ridiculed, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being wronged, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being suspected, 

Deliver me, Jesus.

That others may be loved more than I, 

Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be esteemed more than I, 

Jesus grant me the grace to desire it.

That in the opinion of the world, others may increase, and I may decrease,

Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be chosen and I set aside, 

Jesus grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be praised and I unnoticed, 

Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be preferred to me in everything, 

Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may become holier than I,

provided that I become as holy as I should, 

Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.